Piano as an Investment

This is a chart of how well pianos have done as an investment strategy. We have used older data so as not to show any “bubble” effect.

As you can see over a 20 year period quality pianos appreciate very well.

Steinway Pianos are very good investments, so is the Baldwin Grand Pianos that really shine as an investment.

These piano investments are tax free.

 

 

 

Grand Pianos

Brand Size 1986 1990 1995 2000 2005 2X Y# % Increase
Steinway 6’10.5 $27,180 $31,158 $39,960 $48,510 $57,870 17 113%
Baldwin 6’3 $11,739 $13,890 $17,642 $23,152 $39,345 15 235%
Yamaha 6″1″ $10,322 $12,315 $17,918 $21,968 $23,543 14 128%
Kawai 6’11” $8,141 $9,821 $17,168 $20,093 $22.043 10 171%
Schimmel 6′ $13,064 $14,816 $23,344 $27,664 $33,904 12 160%

Vertical
Pianos

Brand Size 1986 1990 1995 2000 2005 2X Y# % Increase
Steinway 46.5″ $7,376 $8,892 $11,790 $14,769 $17,640 14 139%
Baldwin 45″ $2,645 $3,246 $3,816 $4,128 $6,688 17 152%
Yamaha 48″ $3,559 $3,758 $5,018 $5,993 $6,075 22 83%
Kawai 49″ $3,559 $3,575 $5,018 $5,693 $5,993 23 83%
Schimmel 48″ $5,272 $6,336 $9,264 $10,464 $12,144 14 130%

Raw data from ANCOTT Associates, an industry pricing guide, we have put together some representative samples of piano selling prices over the past 20 years. We have included two American brands, Steinway & Sons and Baldwin; two Japanese brands, Yamaha and Kawai; as well as one European brand, Schimmel. For each, we have selected one popular grand size and one vertical size. The raw data come from the ANCOTT spring/summer database for each respective year. The prices in our table reflect typical “street” or actual selling prices. We applied traditional discounting to ANCOTT’s Average Suggested Retail prices (sort of MSRP figures). Not an exact science, but consistent across the table.

The prices in these tables are for new pianos. Rebuilt pianos do even better.